Saturday, June 16th

noon – 1:30 pm

Participants Arrive and Connect Laptops to Network – Athenaeum Batza Room Cafe Bio (4th Floor)

1:30 pm
Welcome, Introductions and Overview

Athenaeum Room 422

John R. Jungck, BioQUEST Curriculum Consortium
Ethel Stanley, BioQUEST, Beloit College
Sam Donovan, University of Pittsburgh
Kristin Jenkins, NESCent and BioQUEST, Beloit College

Phase I – During this two day phase, we will explore data, tools, and resources through collaborative problem solving. Participants will develop a poster to present their question and preliminary findings on Wednesday morning. See also – 2012 Investigative Workshops.

I. Title: Data Literacy through Modeling

Leader: Gretchen Koch-Noble, Goucher College
BQ Support Persons: Ethel

Abstract:  Data Literacy involves more than analyzing large data sets; being able to make predictions based on documented data is just as important as analyzing that data.  Mathematical modeling allows scientists to make such predictions and design better experiments.  This workshop will explore how to bring mathematical modeling into the classroom without requiring an extensive mathematics background.  Participants will work collaboratively to explore mathematical modeling just as their students will.  The BioQUEST ESTEEM Project will be featured.

Resources:

ESTEEM:  http://bioquest.org/esteem/

Pharmacokinetics  http://bioquest.org/esteem/esteem_details.php?product_id=39111

Spitznagel Article on Two-Compartment Pharmacokinetics Model:

http://www.codee.org/library/newsletters/Fall%201992/CLA00001_0003.PDF

Synthroid Prescribing Information:  http://www.rxabbott.com/pdf/Synthroid.pdf

Lithium Pharmacokinetics Article

Pharmacokinetics_Models_Lab

II. Title: DryadLab: Ecology and Evolution Curricula Linked to Archived Research Data

Leader: Kristin Jenkins, Sam Donovan and Rob Swanson
BQ support Persons: Kristin and Sam

Abstract: The Dryad Digital Repository is an archive for data underlying articles in the bioscience literature. DryadLab is the educational face to Dryad, which will provide teacher and student resources for learning activities that are based on Dryad data sets. This workshop will introduce you to research resources associated with Galapagos finches, Tribolium competition, primate life history, extinction risks, and wood economics. All the modules were developed through collaborations between scientists and educators and are at various stages of development ranging from generating draft activities to field test ready.


III. Title: Using Geo-referenced Animal Observations for Inquiry

Leaders:  Colleen McLinn and Ileana Betancourt
BQ Support Staff: Stacey, Sam, John

Resource Page

Abstract: The movements, appearance, and behaviors of birds and other animals have long fascinated both scientists and amateur observers. Through structured “citizen science” projects, birdwatchers from around the globe are contributing their observations, and sometimes sound and video recordings, to massive worldwide databases. Advances in visualization and analysis tools and a commitment to open data sharing have made these large archives of data accessible to students and scientists interested in questions about climate change, migration, speciation, and sexual selection. When these data are geo-referenced, attributes of animals at a location can be related to features of the natural and built environment, opening additional opportunities for research and inquiry. In this session, we will focus on tools for in-depth analysis of animal sounds and occurrence data, as well as how to access relevant habitat information.

2:00 – 4:00 pm Session A Group 1 in Room 422: Data Literacy through Modeling  Group 2 in Batza Room –  Cafe Bio PC: DryadLab: Ecology and Evolution Curricula Linked to Archived Research Data
4:00 – 5:30 pm

Break & optional campus tour

5:30 pm

Dinner – Buchner Hall

7:00 pm  Public Talk – Buchner Hall    Dr. James Collins Interdisciplinary programs are reshaping biology’s role in science educationLate 20th and early 21st century discoveries in biology are driving advances within the life sciences and at their interface with many other areas of scholarship. Biology research and education today differ from how they were done 10 or even 5 years ago. Today’s frontiers are often at disciplinary edges filling the white spaces between our traditional disciplines at the intersection of biology and computer and information sciences, engineering, geosciences, mathematics, physical sciences, and social sciences. Biology has broadened immensely in the last 25 years, especially in interdisciplinary areas. What gets included in “the life sciences” is expanding rapidly highlighting the importance of approaches to learning that emphasize the process of discovery itself. The challenge going forward is training students to be experts who can also move beyond traditional disciplinary borders. This takes on special importance early in the 21st century when biology is emerging as a gateway science for learning to think about complex systems, which often call for interdisciplinary approaches to collaborative problem solving using models and large datasets. The presentation will focus on the evolving life sciences and the challenge of preparing students to cope with these changes.

Sunday, June 17th

7:30 – 8:15 am

Breakfast at Stimson Dining Hall

8:30 – 10:15 am
Session BGroup 1 in Room 422: Data Literacy through ModelingGroup 2 in Batza Room – Cafe Bio: Using Geo-referenced Animal Observations for Inquiry
10:15 – 10:30 am Break – Batza Room – Cafe Bio (4th Floor)
10:30 – 12:15 am Session C Group 1 in Room 422: Ecology and Evolution Curricula Linked to Archived Research DataGroup 2 in Batza Room – Cafe BioUsing Geo-referenced Animal Observations for Inquiry
12:15 – 1:00 pm

Lunch at Stimson Dining Hall

1:30 – 3:30 pm Phase 1 Project Discussion – Room 422 Session Leaders Panel &  Group FormationGroups:1) Bird Calls Affected by Coverage – Linda V. and David G.2) Use of Historical Data to Answer Modern Questions – Tamah F., Joel H., John K., Rob S.3) Effects of Urban Growth on Birds – Linda G., Steve4) GIS Distribution of Shorebirds with Habitat Data, and an Analysis of the Quality of Cornell Data – Bruce, Joel H., Jeff., Dave B., Rich5) Model Predictive Success of a Marriage or Behavior Change in Water Use – Tamah F., Sofya6) Flow Models for Liver or a Lake – Jenny, Dave B., Sofya, Kelly S.7) Data set on Faukland Island Guanaco population – Justin P., Marsha T.8 Climate Change Effects on Phenology –  Gigi, Joyce C., Karen,
3:30 – 4:00 pm

Break –  Cafe Bio (4th Floor)

4:00 – 5:30 pm Group Work Session – Room 422 & Cafe Bio (4th Floor)
5:45 – 6:15 pm

Dinner at Stimson Dining Hall

6:30 – 8:00 pm Dessert and Group Work Session – Room 422 & Cafe Bio (4th Floor)

Monday, June 18th

 7:30 – 8:15 am

Breakfast at Stimson Dining Hall

8:30 – 10:30 am

Preparation for Electronic Poster Session

Room 422 & Cafe Bio (4th Floor)

10:30 am – noon

Poster Presentations – Room 422

12:15 – 1:00 pm

Lunch at Stimson Dining Hall

1:30 – 2:30 pm

Science Case Network: Making a Difference with Data – Room 422 Margaret Waterman

Southeast Missouri State University

SCNandData  Powerpoint

Choices    Case Analysis Responses

Bad Project (humor)

2:30 – 3:00 pm

Break – Cafe Bio (4th Floor)

Phase II – During the second phase of the workshop, partipants will work on curriculum development projects.

3:00 – 5:00 pm

Discussion of project options and group formation

5:45 – 6:15 pm

Dinner at Stimson Dining Hall

6:30 – 8:30 pm

Groups – Cafe Bio (4th Floor) Group formation and resource exploration(Staff Meeting 7-8:30)

Tuesday, June 19th

 7:30 – 8:15 am

Breakfast at Stimson Dining Hall

9:00 am-12:00 pm

Group work on curriculum projects

12:15 – 1:00 pm

Lunch at Stimson Dining Hall

1:30 – 2:30 pm

Groups meet with BQ staff and provide updates on projects.

2:30 – 5:00 pm

BIG DATA                                  Room 422

Principal Component Analysis – Exploring Data with Multivariate Methods

Claudia Neuhauser     Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs

HHMI and Distinguished McKnight Professor
Director, Center for Learning Innovation
Director, Graduate Studies, Biomedical Informatics & Computational Biology
University of Minnesota – Rochester

Resources

BQ2012 Principal Component Analysis Worksheet PDF
BQ2012 Principal Component Analysis Worksheet Word

PCA Worksheet BQ2012

BQ 2012 Principal Component Analysis  (Presentation)

Principal Component Analysis Resources

NumbersCount   See Data: Bumpus Data

Data Collection and Organization F. Price

5:45 – 6:15 pm

Dinner at Stimson Dining Hall

6:30 – 8:30 pm

Group work – Cafe Bio (4th Floor)(Staff Meeting 7-8:30)

Wednesday, June 20th

 7:30 – 8:15 am

Breakfast at Stimson Dining Hall

9:00 am – 12:00 pm

Case It                                               Cafe Bio (4th Floor)

Mark Bergland   Department Chair, Biology    University of Wisconsin – River Falls

Karen Klyczek    Professor, Biology    University of Wisconsin – River Falls

Case It! is a NSF sponsored project which provides a framework for collaborative case-based learning via free, open-ended molecular biology simulations and cases based primarily on genetic and infectious disease. This working session will provide:

  • Hands-on experience with Case It software simulation
  • Example cases, data analysis
  • Demonstration of mobile version for smart phones/tablets
  • Discussion of classroom implementation, case development, follow-up opportunities

12:15 – 1:00 pm

Lunch at Stimson Dining Hall

1:30 – 3:30 pm

Group work on curriculum projects(Board Meeting 1:30-3:00pm)

3:30 – 5:30 pm

Resource Sharing and 4-H Show – Room 422

This open session will be a series of short demonstrations/presentations of programs, tools, and resources that participants want to share.

5:45 – 6:15 pm

Dinner at Stimson Dining Hall

6:30 – 8:30 pm

Group Work Time – Cafe Bio (4th Floor)

Thursday, June 21st

7:30 – 8:15 am 

Breakfast at Stimson Dining Hall

9:00 am – 12:00 pm

Project Groups – Cafe Bio (4th Floor)

  • Meet with Curriculum Project Staff – Room 422
  • Group project work time

12:15 – 1:00 pm

Lunch at Stimson Dining Hall

1:30 – 3:00 pm

Group project work time – Cafe Bio (4th Floor)

3:00 – 3:30 pm

Break – Cafe Bio (4th Floor)

3:30 – 5:30 pm

Getting group projects posted onto the blog – Room 422

 We will show you how to share your project materials using the workshop blog.

5:45 – 6:15 pm 

Dinner at Stimson Dining Hall

7:30 – 8:30 pm

Presentations I – Room 422

Friday, June 22nd

7:30 – 8:15 am

Breakfast at Stimson Dining Hall

9:00 – 11:00 am

Presentations II – Room 422

11:00 am – noon

Wrapping up, Next steps, Evaluation – Cafe Bio

Also please remember to complete the Survey on BioMath