Schedule

2010 BioQUEST Workshop

Global Health in Undergraduate Education:

Focus on Cyberlearning

lobby


Saturday, June 12th


12-1:30      Connect your laptop to Beloit College network—–Science Center Atrium


1:30 PM     Welcome, Introductions, and Overview—–Science Center 150

John R. Jungck, BioQUEST Curriculum Consortium

Marion Fass, Beloit College

Ethel Stanley, BioQUEST, Beloit College

Sam Donovan, University of Pittsburgh

Kristin Jenkins, NESCent and BioQUEST, Beloit College


Phase I – During this two day phase, we will explore data, tools, and resources in

global health curricula. Based on these experiences, groups of participants will

develop a project to present on Tuesday after dinner.


2:00-3:30  Global Health Session A


Group 1: Global Health and Nutrition: Featuring Gapminder—–SC 340

Leaders: Marion Fass, Beloit College

Group 2: Quantitative Approaches to Global Epidemics—–SC 347

Leaders: John R. Jungck, Beloit College

Tony Weisstein, Truman State University


4:00-5:30  Global Health Session B


Group 1: Quantitative Approaches to Global Epidemics—–SC 340

Leaders: John R. Jungck, Beloit College

Tony Weisstein, Truman State University

Group 2: Global Antibiotic Use and the Rise of Resistance—–SC 347

Leaders: Julie Seiter, Oakland Community College

Ethel Stanley, BioQUEST Beloit College


5:30-6:30  Beloit and Vicinity Gallery Stroll and Awards Reception—–Wright Museum of Art


6:45            Dinner—–President’s Dining Room


7:30            Population Health as a Human Right

Marion Fass, Beloit College

Marion and groupInfusing global health into the introductory biology curriculum enhances the linkages between cell and molecular levels of organization and the ecology while connecting students to real world issues of quality of life and social justice. The human right to good health is a right of populations.  It includes far more than access to medical care, although that is certainly important. The Millennium Development Goals of the UN emphasize the need to alleviate poverty, a key strategy for good health. Good health is based on availability of clean water, good food and sanitation; it is enhanced by maternal education, lack of environmental pollution and peace.

Students can construct relationships between life expectancy and the determinants of health using data made available by UNICEF, FAO and other international organizations.  Videos from UNICEF, Partners in Health and other NGOs enhance understanding by providing examples of the lived experience of individuals with epidemic diseases, food shortages, or the challenges of obtaining good water.

Online resources such as the graphing tools of Gapminder and the mapping tools of Worldmapper enable students to enter into investigations based on data used by professionals to define local and global needs. Teaching about global health engages students’ intellects as they grapple to define the problems that have already engaged their emotions.

Sunday, June 13th


8:00 AM     Breakfast at Commons


9:00-10:45 Global Health Curriculum Session C


Group 1: Global Antibiotic Use and the Rise of Resistance—–SC 347

Leaders: Julie Seiter, Oakland Community College

Ethel Stanley, BioQUEST Beloit College

Group 2: Global Health and Nutrition: Featuring Gapminder—–SC 340

Leaders: Marion Fass, Beloit College


10:45-11:15 Break


11:15-12:00  Phase I Project—–SC 349

Session Leaders Panel

Group formation


12:00-1:30   Lunch at Commons


1:30-2:30 Introducing the BioQUEST C3 Project—–SC 150

CloverboardSam Donovan, University of Pittsburgh

Kristin Jenkins, NESCent and BioQUEST, Beloit College


2:30-3:30   Group Work Session—–SC 340, 347


3:30-4:00   Break


4:00-5:00   Building Partnerships to Use Earth Observations to Improve Global Health: A Perspective on the Interaction of Science, Policy, and Decision-Making—–SC 150

Joan L. Aron, American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)

joanaron


5:00             Dinner at Commons


6:30-8:00    Group Work Session—–SC 340, 347


Monday, June 14th

8:00 AM        Breakfast at Commons


9:00-10:00    Preparation for Electronic Poster Session—–SC 340


10:00-11:30  Poster Presentations—–SC Atrium


11:30-1:00     Lunch at Commons


1:00-2:30       Exploring Cancer with Gapminder—–SC 340

Claudia Neuhauser, University of Minnesota Rochester


2:30-3:00        Break


3:00-5:00        Modeling Tumor Growth with Excel—–SC 340

Claudia Neuhauser, University of Minnesota Rochester


5:30                  Dinner at Commons


6:30-8:30         Introduce Phase II Project and Extended Introductions—–SC Atrium


Tuesday, June 15th


8:00 AM           Breakfast at Commons


Phase II – During the second phase of the workshop, participants take on the role of adopters, adapters and reviewers to consider the potential of existing materials and tools. Collaborators will work on a module for use in their own courses, present it to the other participants,

and post to the web as summer 2010 projects.


9:00-11:30      Group formation and resource exploration

Sign up and then meet with Curriculum Project staff—–SC 349

Group Project work time—–SC 340, 347


11:30-12:30    Lunch at Commons


12:30-2:00      Group project work time—–SC 340, 347


2:00-3:00         Evolution and Human Health—–SC 349

Kristin Jenkins, NESCent


3:00                  Break


3:30-5:00         Education and Social Media: Addressing 21st-Century Learners—–SC 150

Sam Donovan, University of Pittsburgh


5:30                   Pizza and Dessert at John Jungck’s (730 Harrison Avenue, 3 blocks east of campus)


Wednesday, June 16th


8:00 AM              Breakfast at Commons


9:00-10:00         Cyberlearning with Digital Libraries – Applied Math and Science Education Repository (AMSER)—–SC 349

Edward Almasy, University of Wisconsin-Madison


10:30-10:45       Break


10:45-12:00       Group project work time—–SC 340, 347


12:00-2:00         Lunch at Commons


2:00-4:30           Group project work time—–SC 340, 347

Meet with project staff of the curriculum projects—–SC 349

in interinstitutional teams


4:30-5:30           Group Discussion—–SC 349


5:45                     Dinner at Commons


7:00-9:00           Annual Learning Materials 4-H Show—–SC 340

Participants share their favorite curricular materials, tools, data, online

resources, media, workshop presentation, etc.


Thursday, June 17th


8:00 AM              Breakfast at Commons


9:00-12:00         Group project work time—–SC 340, 347


12:00-1:30         Lunch at Commons


1:30-3:00            Group project work time—–SC 340, 347


3:00-3:30            Break


3:30-5:00            Project Presentations I—–SC 349


6:00                     Dinner at Commons


7:00                     Open


Friday, June 18th


8:00 AM               Breakfast at Commons


9:00-11:00           Project Presentations II—–SC 349


11:00-11:30        Looking ahead to the 2011 Summer Workshop—–SC 349

Evaluations


11:30-12:30         Lunch at Commons



Note: We will begin running a shuttle van to the bus station at 11:00 A.M.

You should plan to arrive at the O’Hare airport at least 1.5 hours prior to departure.

Van Galder Shuttle buses depart regularly for O’Hare Airport from South Beloit.

Check http://www.vangalderbus.com/vgschedule.html to see when each

bus departs Friday and when each bus arrives at O’Hare.

Infusing global health into the introductory biology curriculum enhances the linkages between cell and molecular levels of organization and the ecology while connecting students to real world issues of quality of life and social justice. The human right to good health is a right of populations. It includes far more than access to medical care, although that is certainly important. The Millennium Development Goals of the UN emphasize the need to alleviate poverty, a key strategy for good health. Good health is based on availability of clean water, good food and sanitation; it is enhanced by maternal education, lack of environmental pollution and peace.

Students can construct relationships between life expectancy and the determinants of health using data made available by UNICEF, FAO and other international organizations. Videos from UNICEF, Partners in Health and other NGOs enhance understanding by providing examples of the lived experience of individuals with epidemic diseases, food shortages, or the challenges of obtaining good water.

Online resources such as the graphing tools of Gapminder and the mapping tools of Worldmapper enable students to enter into investigations based on data used by professionals to define local and global needs. Teaching about global health engages students’ intellects as they grapple to define the problems that have already engaged their emotions.