Add a Comment with a Resource

Posted by on Jan 07 2009 | Tools and Resources

To test your login, get you oriented to blogs, and collect some resources please add a comment to this post listing a resource that you think others would be interested in learning about

Please provide a brief description of the resource so everyone knows why you shared it.

18 comments for now

18 Responses to “Add a Comment with a Resource”

  1. sdonovan@pitt.edu

    If you are interested in general information about online productivity tools you should check out the Online Productivity Toolbox.

    http://mashable.com/2007/06/21/online-productivity-toolbox/

    07 Jan 2009 at 12:19 pm

  2. pelesko@math.udel.edu

    A neat resource for data about bird populations is:

    http://www.pwrc.usgs.gov/BBS/

    John

    07 Jan 2009 at 12:59 pm

  3. mark.s.bergland@uwrf.edu

    Case It! web site – open-ended molecular biology computer simulations for case-based learning

    http://caseit.uwrf.edu/

    07 Jan 2009 at 1:00 pm

  4. christopher.beck@emory.edu

    Check out http://plants.usda.gov.

    07 Jan 2009 at 1:00 pm

  5. mwaterman@semo.edu

    For more about cases including some more resources fo pollen, go to the resources in the My Plant IT project at

    http://www.myplantit.org/resources.php

    07 Jan 2009 at 1:01 pm

  6. drrand@oakwood.edu

    Thanks for the information.

    07 Jan 2009 at 1:01 pm

  7. mwaterman@semo.edu

    For many more cases and information on how to teach with cases go to

    http://bioquest.org/icbl

    07 Jan 2009 at 1:02 pm

  8. raquell@bu.edu

    If you have a course that uses research literature and would like to have some quantitative cell biology papers, a list published articles with models created in the Virtual Cell are available on the Published Models page at http://vcell.org/

    http://vcell.org/applications/published%20_models.html

    07 Jan 2009 at 1:02 pm

  9. jaseiter@oaklandcc.edu

    A new mash-up called Health Map is a fantastic resource for tracking worldwide outbreaks of diseases. http://www.healthmap.org/en
    Julie

    07 Jan 2009 at 1:02 pm

  10. aolifer@emory.edu

    http://www.sfn.org/index.cfm?pagename=informationForGeneralPublic

    has very interesting links on neuroscience for everybody.

    Andrei

    07 Jan 2009 at 1:03 pm

  11. pmars@learnlink.emory.edu

    Please check out Cases OnLine. We don’t have any pollen spaces so far, but we have lots of other cases. http://www.cse.emory.edu/cases/

    07 Jan 2009 at 1:03 pm

  12. RXL5@PSU.EDU

    If you want to relate distribution of pollen data to other environmental data on maps consider DIVA.

    http://www.diva-gis.org/

    07 Jan 2009 at 1:04 pm

  13. mnwill@cau.edu

    Journal of Visualized Experiments is an interesting use of “You Tube” style videos for laboratory methods:
    http://www.jove.org

    07 Jan 2009 at 1:05 pm

  14. vpotluri@csu.edu

    Swedish Palynological Institute has a vast database on worldwide pollen information

    07 Jan 2009 at 1:05 pm

  15. clin@winona.edu

    Resource: http://fold.it
    Comment: A protein folding game developed by the University of Washington

    07 Jan 2009 at 1:07 pm

  16. megan@iskme.org

    The Great Backyard Bird Count is an anual four-day bird count for citizen scientists of all ages to contribute bird data with Cornell Lab of Ornithology and the Audubon Society

    http://www.birdsource.org/gbbc/

    07 Jan 2009 at 1:07 pm

  17. cmcentee@kbcc.cuny.edu

    Always useful for weather related questions:www.nasa.gov/offices/education/about/index.html

    07 Jan 2009 at 1:09 pm

  18. karen.k.klyczek@uwrf.edu

    I don’t have any pollen resources to offer, but one of my favorites sites is the influenza resource page at NCBI. It includes a sequence database, analysis tools, and lots of other resources. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/genomes/FLU/FLU.html

    07 Jan 2009 at 2:22 pm

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