Lifelines Online Summer 2000

Faculty Workshop

 Author Suzanne Martin
 Case Study
The Park
 

Press Release:

Jerry Curtis invites the public to the November meeting of the Moberly Park District Board. The board requests input to their proposed five-year plan for Rothwell Park. Citizens have recently complained to Mr. Curtis about branches falling on the walking rail and playground during windstorms and about the potential for injury to people using the park. Another matter to be discussed in the continuing expense of removing dead trees. During the past year, approximately 80 trees, mostly large white oaks, were removed from the 885-acre park. Many of these trees were removed from the area of the new dock and parking lot.

 

Rothwell Park Description from Chamber of Commerce Brochure:

Roth well Park was established in 1901 on the west side of the city of Moberly. The 885 acre park provides opportunities for boating, fishing, swimming, picnicking, walking and horseback riding. It contains a public swimming pool, Deer Pond. and Rothwell Lake. Much of the park is undeveloped woodland, which supports a variety of wildflowers and birds as well as deer and foxes.

Question 

What is happening to the park?

Getting Started 

What is the case about?

What do you already know?

What do you want to know?

Make a KW chart, each student using a different color pen.

 
Problem Solving 

What is likely to happen to the trees in the next five years?

Instructor provides:

-Maps of Rothwell Park indicating new and existing improvements (construction, surfacing, etc.) and tree removal for a period of 20 years.

-Observations of trees in park with photos.

-Information on park maintenance schedule, states explicitly that. pruning is done only if the roof of a structure is threatened and no spraying or fertilizing is done.

Add to KW chart, again each student using a different color pen..
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What should the Park Board consider in discussing the five-year plan?

Instructor provides:

-Chamber of Commerce Rothwell Park Brochure:

Roth well Park was established in 1901 on the west side of the city of Moberly. The 885 acre park provides opportunities for boating, fishing, swimming, picnicking, walking and horseback riding. It contains a public swimming pool, Deer Pond. and Rothwell Lake. Much of the park is undeveloped woodland, which supports a variety of wildflowers, birds, deer and foxes.

-More Than Trees video. (Missouri Department of Conservation classic.)

Revise your KW chart.

Then write another draft of the KW chart as if your group were the Park Board.

Resources 

OVERSTUFFED LIST OF RESOURCES
* indicates that resources are already on hand

1.*Missouri Department of Conservation publications: Oaks and Hickories of Missouri, Trees of Missouri, Missouri Trees in Winter, Wild Mammals of Missouri, Walk Softly on the Eatrh, Wild Mushrooms of Missouri, etc.
2. *Teaching specimens prepared by past Botany students, posters prepared by past biology students
3. *Missouri Conservationist articles on Oaks ("The Mighty Oak", "Living with Trees"? article on preserving Trees during construction) and food webs
4. *Missouri Department of conservation website, Forestry section
5. *USDA extension publications: Forest Insect and Disease Leaflet 165
6. Photos and info on insects which are/not tree pests
7. *Diseases of Midwestern Trees, Ortho Problem Solver,
8. *Flora of Missouri, Peterson Field Guides to the Eastern Forests and Guide to the Trees and Shrubs
9. *Moberly-Monitor-Index article(s?) on Rothwell Park, possibly articles on storm damage
10. Photos of Komar Hall site from before construction to *present
11. Photos and PR for Rothwell park
12. Tape of interview with Jerry Curtis from KWIX??
13. Moberly Historical Society displays? and* excerpts from Ralph Gerhard's booklet on Moberly history info on original vegetation of area and on park
14. *Natural History: "What are Squirrels Hiding?" and etc
15. Organizations and people, local or on-line contacts, including several of my former students: Moberly Park Department (Carolee Hazlett, Jerry Curtis) MDC (Bill Bergh, Rick Thom), USDA personnel, US Soil Conservation Service Macon Office, UMC School of Wildlife, Forestwatchers, Corps of Engineers at Long Branch Lake (Don Goers, Mike Monda) Project Lep and North Park (?) Grade School (Ron Self, Cathy Ferguson, Charlie Robb)
16. *Missouri Ozark Forest Ecosystem Project <>
17. The Oak (children's book suggested by Ethel Stanley)
18. Sand County Almanac, Aldo Leopold: His Life and Writing video
19. Master List Survey of species on Park and Campus
20. Information oak hybrid swarms
21. Information on arboriculture
22. *Outside In short item on dedrochronology , excerpt from Northington, Goodin on dendrochronology
23. tree boring tool, wood samples, sandpaper, measuring tapes
24. *Ortho leaflet on lawn weeds, Weeds of the Midwestern States
25. *Excerpt on acorn as microecosytem from Smith
26. Winter Twig Key, Trip to the Forest software
27. *Josh Steven's red maple observation log
28. *LaGene Holman's recipe report and specimens
29. *soil test kit
30. Berlese funnels, lights, pans,, etc.
31. Graphing software
32. *Rothwell Park and adjoining MACC campus

Artifacts 

POSSIBLE ACTIVITIES
* indicates activity done at least in part during one or more past semesters
#indicates my judgment that activity fits student interests, concerns and style better than other activities

1. *#interview on-line or in person of resource individual based on current interview assignment (generate list of possible candidates, questions, practice interview,do interview, read interview for questions for guest speaker)
2. *use keys and specimens. to identify oak species and other trees in park
3. *# construction of food web for park
4. *# examine bark with lens for fungi, insects, etc., possibly small moist chambers or culturing,
4. survey lichens and fungi growing on/under oaks, describe rather that identify
5. survey of park to estimate biodiversity
6. #?survey of park to and determine approximate size of population of oak species vs. other trees (esp. hickory) and % of trees dead or dying
7. *#open acorns, examine weevils, estimate weevil percentage
8. *#examine cores, slabs or stumps to determine life history of tree-stressors, age, year cut
9. examine stumps, snags or downed trees or large branches for evidence of succession
10. examine areas around stumps for evidence of change and relate to length of time since tree was cut
11. #collect acorns, weigh, estimate mast crop
12. *#plant acorns, estimate percentage germ
13. #? try out acorn recipes
14. *keep log of observations of individual tree
15. *bark rubbing and descriptions for oaks
16. *#visit 4 Acres Nursery for talk on tree planting and landscaping
17. *#collect and label leaves and or teaching specimens
18. #contact guest speaker and intro to class either on campus or on site (i.e., bring guest to class or class to guest)

OTHER POSSIBLE PRODUCTS
* indicates product of assignment during some or most past semesters

1. *written interview (intro, transcript, summary)
2. construction of simple key for local trees for use by North Park students or biology students
3. mini-poster presentation on a tree disease
4. presentation to mock park board meeting with supporting materials
5. presentation to MACC admin and grounds staff regarding management of oaks on MACC campus and future of Agora
6. report on plant/pathogen/environment triangle, possibly in diagrammatic form
7. video tape or photo essay or exhibit for Moberly historical society on park in 2000 with commentary on past and predictions for future
8. * list of organisms observed in park with evidence of consumption
9. * park food web
10. *set of specimens for use in park by North park students, scouts etc. labeled with morphological, taxonomic and ecological information (in past done for botany students)
11. material for park trail guide or brochure
12. *log of observations of individual tree with questions and drawings or photo
13. report of results of observations re stumps, succession acorns etc. with questions generated by students
14. drawings of bark or acorns as microecosystem
15. illustrated list of organisms found living on or under white oak trees
16. test hypothese about tree rings being broader on south side of tree also more branching on south side as modification of BSCS Green activity.
17. #Display and or dramatic presentation and or activities for North park students on life of a tree in Rothwell Park to be given in park

Assessment and Evaluation 

The main objective of the case study is that students will discover interactions between an important and representative plant (White oak) and its environment.

The case study would be used in plant identification (unit 1, week 3) although some of the objectives deal with topics considered later in the course.

Secondary objectives:

Students will be able to consistently identify a small group of important oak species and state what features they are using for identification.

Students will be able to give supported answers to the following:

What is the white oak's place in the park food web?
What would happen to the food web if the white oaks were removed?
What is the food web of another ecosystem, how might it be disturbed and what might be the result?


Students will demonstrate through that both environmental conditions and pathogens affect plant health. By e.g., constructing a diagram or history for a specific tree's situation or by stating plausible explanations for variations in tree growth over time as shown in annual rings.

Students will demonstrate that they have increased their ability to ask questions about their local environment and use resources to answer those questions


Further Assessment by Objective:

Objective: Students will demonstrate that they have increased their ability to ask questions about their local environment and use resources to answer those questions

Activity: KW charts
Product :KW charts:
Assessment: Examination of KW charts

Did all students participate i.e., are items and questions in all colors?

Did charts expand after each section?

Were some questions eliminated?

Do charts show any evidence that students moved to using the resources without prompting?

No grading on this.

Objective: Students will be able to consistently identify a small group of important oak species and state what features they are using for identification.

Activity: Use keys and specimens. to identify oak species in park. Student pairs are experts on one species. They locate and flag several trees of the species. Pair then trades materials with another pair who flags more trees. Pairs verify each other's identification. Activity continues until all pairs have flagged all species correctly and can point out differences.
Product: Oral explanations to other pairs and set of flagged trees for individual review if needed. Specimens are also posted in hall for review

Assessment Non-graded assessment by observing students, listening to conversations, watching flagging. :

Individual students take graded identification quiz on, e.g.,15 trees in another location to be identified as white oak, post oak, black oak, pin oak, shingle oak or not an oak including written statement of feature used for identification. Discussion of any difficulties after quiz-I expect all scores to be at or near 100%.

Objective: Students will be able to give supported answers to the following:What is the white oak's place in the park food web? What would happen to the food web if the white oaks were removed?

1. Take copies of master list to park. Working in groups, locate and check off as many species as possible. Be prepared to show species to other groups and or answer questions about their location or condition. Also note on list any evidence of being consumed or consuming other organisms.

2. Again working in base groups, use this information to start a food web. Add information first from other groups then from resources.

3. Write down team consensus as to what information is missing , how this might be obtained, questions you have about this activity and be ready to contribute your comments to class discussion..

Product: . Group report is list with group's notes, diagrams , brief written material.

Assessment: Report graded for participation. Quiz question or short individual assignment. Modified from BDCS Green activity: Given the following information (paragraph on San Francisco Bay area) diagram the food web.

What might be the result if the numbers organism x (specify primary producer) were somewhat reduced?

What if the numbers were drastically reduced?

Objective: Students will demonstrate through that both environmental conditions and pathogens affect plant growth
or by stating plausible explanations for variations in tree growth over time as shown in annual rings

Activity: Examine cores, slabs or stumps to determine life history of tree-stressors, age, year cut

Objectives:: Students will be able to give supported answers to the following:

What is the white oak's place in the park food web?
What would happen to the food web if the white oaks were removed?

Students will demonstrate through that both environmental conditions and pathogens affect plant growth by e.g., constructing a diagram or history for a specific tree's situation
Activity: As group plan and execute a display or dramatic presentation or activities for North park elementary students on the life of a tree in Rothwell Park to be given in park

Product: Display and or dramatic presentation and or activities for North park students on life of a tree in Rothwell Park .

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